MK3 or Mikro preferable when already using S49 Kontrol?

JR1987
JR1987 Member Posts: 3 Noise

Hi, Im quite new to the NI scene but fairly experienced as far as Logic Pro goes.

Recently got back into music production and recording after about a 5 year hiatus.

I recently upgraded my old M-Audio MIDI keyboard to a new S49 Keyboard which I think is a fantastic bit of kit.

I do find however that I dont like triggering samples, Drumming etc on keyboard keys so I was looking for some sort of high quality pad based controller. Naturally I looked at NI and saw the MK3 and the Mikro.

The MK3 looks very nice but its significantly more expensive than the Mikro and on the surface does appear to have 2 things i already own.. the screens and control surface style buttons that exist on my keyboard and also an audio interface which natrually I already own..

Does the MK3 provide benefits over the Mikro even with my existing gear?


Thanks :)

Best Answer

  • ShelLuser
    ShelLuser NetherlandsMember Posts: 133 Tri
    Answer ✓

    Yes, the full controller definitely provides some huge advantages. Now, please keep bias in mind but I can say that I own both controllers and thus I can share personal experiences, but I need to emphasize on bias a bit.

    Thing is: the one thing I always disliked within my workflow 'back in the days' was that setting up my percussion sound in my DAW (which was Reason back in those days) would never sound the same when I hit my drumpad (which was an Akai MPD24 back then for me). It wasn't just the controller, but also the issue of having to go back and forth between software and hardware. I'd set something up, then move over to my MPD to test it out.

    The Mikro, despite being one heck of a device, has the same quirks, with an addition problem attached: not only do you fully rely on the software, the software itself also has a bit of a learning curve and that can become rough on its own as well. With the Mk3 otoh you can pretty much customize everything from behind the pads, even fully finetune stuff. Now sure: put the Mikro close to your keyboard & mouse, hit the pads with one hand and move your mouse with the other? ... 🤔

    Errr, no, that doesn't work for me (as such bias!). Tapping a pad while moving a rotary to get 'that' sound I want? Priceless!

    Now, I don't have a Kontrol but I do have a Push from which I can do tons of stuff too. I know it's not directly comparable but setting up percussion while not behind behind your percussion 'device' will never get you conclusive results. Your Kontrol will lack the subtleties, just like my Push does and IMO this is a big deal because both Push & Maschine are pad controllers.

    From my pov you can't really compare your Kontrol with a Maschine, even though there is definitely some overlap. But playing pads is not the same as playing keys. I learned that lesson when I compared my Push to my Casio MIDI keyboard back in the days :)

    Basically you could argue that Kontrol + Maschine = do nearly all of your work behind the controllers vs. having to back and forth to your keyboard and mouse. Now sure, there is no "best" workflow here because it all depends on your own style and habits. But I can honestly say that despite having my Push and me now being very familiar with the Maschine software I'd never give up my Mk3 in favor of a Mikro, even though I could easily make it work. Of course, in full fairness: I don't necessarily have the overlap that you would have.

    But... argument: quickly changing groups. That can become a hot issue when playing live, the Mikro uses a "select button" (press 'groups' then press one of the main pads) while the Mk3 has a dedicated group section. I can't provide other details because my Mikro is "on location", but.. yah. I hope I could give you some ideas here.

Answers

  • ShelLuser
    ShelLuser NetherlandsMember Posts: 133 Tri
    Answer ✓

    Yes, the full controller definitely provides some huge advantages. Now, please keep bias in mind but I can say that I own both controllers and thus I can share personal experiences, but I need to emphasize on bias a bit.

    Thing is: the one thing I always disliked within my workflow 'back in the days' was that setting up my percussion sound in my DAW (which was Reason back in those days) would never sound the same when I hit my drumpad (which was an Akai MPD24 back then for me). It wasn't just the controller, but also the issue of having to go back and forth between software and hardware. I'd set something up, then move over to my MPD to test it out.

    The Mikro, despite being one heck of a device, has the same quirks, with an addition problem attached: not only do you fully rely on the software, the software itself also has a bit of a learning curve and that can become rough on its own as well. With the Mk3 otoh you can pretty much customize everything from behind the pads, even fully finetune stuff. Now sure: put the Mikro close to your keyboard & mouse, hit the pads with one hand and move your mouse with the other? ... 🤔

    Errr, no, that doesn't work for me (as such bias!). Tapping a pad while moving a rotary to get 'that' sound I want? Priceless!

    Now, I don't have a Kontrol but I do have a Push from which I can do tons of stuff too. I know it's not directly comparable but setting up percussion while not behind behind your percussion 'device' will never get you conclusive results. Your Kontrol will lack the subtleties, just like my Push does and IMO this is a big deal because both Push & Maschine are pad controllers.

    From my pov you can't really compare your Kontrol with a Maschine, even though there is definitely some overlap. But playing pads is not the same as playing keys. I learned that lesson when I compared my Push to my Casio MIDI keyboard back in the days :)

    Basically you could argue that Kontrol + Maschine = do nearly all of your work behind the controllers vs. having to back and forth to your keyboard and mouse. Now sure, there is no "best" workflow here because it all depends on your own style and habits. But I can honestly say that despite having my Push and me now being very familiar with the Maschine software I'd never give up my Mk3 in favor of a Mikro, even though I could easily make it work. Of course, in full fairness: I don't necessarily have the overlap that you would have.

    But... argument: quickly changing groups. That can become a hot issue when playing live, the Mikro uses a "select button" (press 'groups' then press one of the main pads) while the Mk3 has a dedicated group section. I can't provide other details because my Mikro is "on location", but.. yah. I hope I could give you some ideas here.

  • JR1987
    JR1987 Member Posts: 3 Noise

    Thank you for the great reponse. I will be sure to take all this into account when finally making my mind up!

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