Audio Modeling instead of gigs and gigs of sampling...

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  • Jon Watte
    Jon Watte Member Posts: 77 Advisor

    As a software developer, I can tell you that, for someone whose main focus is music DSP processing, dealing with network downloads, installers, file systems, anti-virus, and the UI of all of this, would be much harder and generally outside their comfort zone.

    Programmers have specializations, just like doctors, or DJs. Physical modeling has a long history of research, and lots of good algorithms in published papers one could implement. It's more a question of where the demand is. If you make a physically modeled instrument that requires four different control channels of input, you'll see a few of them to a very specialized clientele. If you make an instrument that sounds flashy and fantastic when you just press a key on the keyboard, you will sell many more of them, to another clientele.

    If the "I really want the most control" crowd had lots of money and was willing to pay tens of thousands of dollars per instrument, maybe we'd see more of them...

  • Kubrak
    Kubrak Member Posts: 2,761 Expert

    I would add that part of problems may also be that installation center deals with licencing system. If someone breaks in that system, it might be substantial loss for NI. So, there must be techniques used to make decompiling as hard as possible. And it on the other side may make finding and removing bugs rather difficult....

    I do not know programmer that likes working on user interface. It is the second least interesting thing to do. The first is program documentation and user guide.

  • LostInFoundation
    LostInFoundation Member Posts: 4,036 Expert

    And in fact I was talking about the Native Access team. Which main focus is exactly “network downloads, installers, file systems, anti-virus, and the UI of all of this”. NI is a big company with specialized team, each team has its own task, as they always say. Is not like a family business where the guy that makes one job at the end of the day also clean the floor. This team comfort zone is exactly those points. They’ve been hired for this. They are not the guys that provides us also the instruments

  • DunedinDragon
    DunedinDragon Member Posts: 280 Pro

    If you have a programmer working on user manuals and documentation you need to have a bigger team with more specialization. But that goes a long way toward explaining why some manuals are no help at all.

  • nightjar
    nightjar Member Posts: 1,241 Guru

    User Interface is hugely important and should not be done by anyone uninterested in it.

    Not giving proper regard to the user experience is tremendous failure with many products.

  • nightjar
    nightjar Member Posts: 1,241 Guru
    edited May 2023

    From the quote:  If you make a physically modeled instrument that requires four different control channels of input, you'll see a few of them to a very specialized clientele. If you make an instrument that sounds flashy and fantastic when you just press a key on the keyboard, you will sell many more of them, to another clientele.

    This is not take into account the concept of having a new AI product category that performs the modeled instrument (under a variable degree of guidance from the user) controlling MORE than 4 different control channels. This would be a fascinating and rich area for growth. This AI product could "listen" to other parts and adjust with nuanced articulations, potentially far more expressive than the limits of sampled instruments.

    This will be a HUGE new thing for creative music making.

    And would serve the needs of all clientele using the same modeled instrument. No need to separate the fundamental instrument between a "very specialized clientele" and those wanting to just press a key.

  • Kubrak
    Kubrak Member Posts: 2,761 Expert
    edited May 2023

    @nightjar Yes, user interface is important. But the least interesting thing to do.

  • nightjar
    nightjar Member Posts: 1,241 Guru
    edited May 2023

    That's a matter of opinion. Some people find it very interesting.

    Some people enjoy optimizing workflow and usability and designing a smart user interface is a primary thing.

    In fact, whatever the sound generating instrument lay underneath, the user interface has become the more distinguishing feature.

  • Kubrak
    Kubrak Member Posts: 2,761 Expert

    I do not know any.

    People have various preferences, so I would not be surprised if there are few programmers that enjoy working on UI.

  • nightjar
    nightjar Member Posts: 1,241 Guru

    There are specialists for this on a product team. My daughter and son-in-law are both industrial designers and this is the type of thing they do. It is a passion.

  • PulseCode
    PulseCode Member Posts: 131 Helper

    I agree, audio modling did it, and it does not cost 1000s of dollars...

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