Connecting Kompete Kontrol S61 to Home Cinema Amplifier Yamaha RX-A4A

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Franck Louis
Franck Louis Member Posts: 5 Member
edited February 2023 in Komplete Kontrol

Hello,

I would like to output the sound played from Kompete Kontrol S61 to my home cinema speakers for a better sound, is this possible?

My Yamaha RX-A4A has a RJ-45 entry to allow connection to internet box, however I want to connect with the RJ-45 cable directly to my computer to avoid having to access the wi-fi internet.

It is possible to change ip addresses in the menu of the Yamaha RX-A4A to allow to communicate with my PC but I have no idea how to set all of this up to be able to output the Kompete Kontrol S61 sound to my home cinema speaker system.

Is there anyone with this technical knowledge that can help?

many thanks

Best Answer

  • JesterMgee
    JesterMgee Member Posts: 2,659 Expert
    Answer ✓
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    Was not assuming he is a "block head" and I work in support so "reading between the lines" is a 30 year long skill I have had to build.

    I was picking up on terms such as this:

    My Yamaha RX-A4A has a RJ-45 entry to allow connection to internet box, however I want to connect with the RJ-45 cable directly to my computer to avoid having to access the wi-fi internet.

    And then this:

     I have no idea how to set all of this up to be able to output the Kompete Kontrol S61 sound to my home cinema speaker system.

    This suggests to me the users knowledge of networking and TCP/IP is limited and therefore trying to explain the depths on how it "could" be done are probably not a good idea considering the myriad of reasons to NOT do things this way, same as I would also NOT suggest people use Bluetooth to stream this kind of thing because real-time audio is far different than watching a video or listening to a funky tune. Pressing a key on a keyboard and waiting for the audio is not something people adapt to and anything over about 12ms of delay can become problematic, dealing with network or BT delays can be in the seconds.

    Using a good ole RCA cable is the way to go in this case, simple and will work.

    I'm guessing developers might have bluetooth in concept to work with DAWS one day.

    Not with consumer level bluetooth gear, the delays are just far too great for it to be of use. Wireless transeviers do exist in the pro world but are built for purpose with a strong focus on reduced latendy and a cost usually to match.

Answers

  • Gee_Flat
    Gee_Flat Member Posts: 906 Guru
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    😃

    So we will assume you don't have an external sound card? How do you listen to KK now? With headphones plugged into computer or through computer speakers?

    Use a mini-pin to RCA stereo cable connected to your PC headphone output and plug it in the aux or cd input of your Yamaha amp.

  • Franck Louis
    Franck Louis Member Posts: 5 Member
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    Yes I currently use headphones pluged into computer.

    I am aware of this option of Using a mini-pin to RCA stereo cable, however I was told that this method will produce more distortion to the sound outputted to my home cinema amplifier, which is why I am wanting to use the Ethernet RJ-45 method, if it is possible to do.

  • Gee_Flat
    Gee_Flat Member Posts: 906 Guru
    edited February 2023
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    It won't distort if you have volumes set correctly, but yes, generally computer soundcards are inferior sonically

    I was thinking about your question since I posted, and started to wonder if what you really want is Optical? But I'm a little out of touch and wasn't aware of the ability to send audio with RJ-45.

    But your S61 keyboard does not contain sound, so it depends on your computers ability to send digital audio.

  • Franck Louis
    Franck Louis Member Posts: 5 Member
    edited February 2023
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    My idea was that it must be possible some how to plug the RJ-45 in my computer and make it send the audio data to my Yamaha amp via a closed home network setup (without accessing the internet) since my Yamaha amp has a RJ-45 port to allow it to access the internet and I am able to modify the static ip address of the Yamaha amp by entering into the menu.

  • Gee_Flat
    Gee_Flat Member Posts: 906 Guru
    edited February 2023
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    I have no idea about that. I know some onboard cards use to have a mini pin digital out.

  • JesterMgee
    JesterMgee Member Posts: 2,659 Expert
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    What you are trying to ask, is (in short) not possible.

    Based on the way you are asking the questions, this kind of attempted setup would be a bit beyond your technical knowhow to even try and setup, but more important, a terrible idea.

    I own 2 Yamaha network attached amps and just because they have an "RJ45" connection which allows them to connect to your network, it is not a simple case to just "send audio" to it. The amp can connect to online / network audio sources such as spotify, internet radio streams and airplay so in order to send your audio, you would need to transcode your computers audio to a suitable format that you can then connect to from the amp.

    Airplay is out unless there is some hack way of doing it, usually devices have to be certified to send air play requests. Internet radio stream may be possible... if you want to setup a radio stream service and figure out how to then broadcast that and connect to it from the internet radio service for the amp... However ALL these methods transcode the stream and have a large buffer which means you would hear anywhere up to 5 second delay when you press a key.

    So, forget that as any solution and instead, you simply need a stereo 3.5mm phono plug to stereo RCA cable to connect from your PC audio output into an aux input on the amp. This will 100% work, just depends on a few factors as to how clean it sounds...

    Keep in mind this connection is "unbalanced" which means it can pick up interference or suffer hum/noise from ground loops and you need to make sure the output level of your computer is not too high to overdrive the input of the amp. The longer the cable, the more chance noise can be picked up.

    It's how I use to hook up audio gear 20 years ago before I setup a proper audio system for computer audio with pro interface, balanced connections and proper monitor speakers.

  • Gee_Flat
    Gee_Flat Member Posts: 906 Guru
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    Sometimes when someone asks a weird question we assume the person is a blockhead who has never hooked up equipment. He's not. Read the first two comments.

    I'm guessing developers might have bluetooth in concept to work with DAWS one day.

  • JesterMgee
    JesterMgee Member Posts: 2,659 Expert
    Answer ✓
    Options

    Was not assuming he is a "block head" and I work in support so "reading between the lines" is a 30 year long skill I have had to build.

    I was picking up on terms such as this:

    My Yamaha RX-A4A has a RJ-45 entry to allow connection to internet box, however I want to connect with the RJ-45 cable directly to my computer to avoid having to access the wi-fi internet.

    And then this:

     I have no idea how to set all of this up to be able to output the Kompete Kontrol S61 sound to my home cinema speaker system.

    This suggests to me the users knowledge of networking and TCP/IP is limited and therefore trying to explain the depths on how it "could" be done are probably not a good idea considering the myriad of reasons to NOT do things this way, same as I would also NOT suggest people use Bluetooth to stream this kind of thing because real-time audio is far different than watching a video or listening to a funky tune. Pressing a key on a keyboard and waiting for the audio is not something people adapt to and anything over about 12ms of delay can become problematic, dealing with network or BT delays can be in the seconds.

    Using a good ole RCA cable is the way to go in this case, simple and will work.

    I'm guessing developers might have bluetooth in concept to work with DAWS one day.

    Not with consumer level bluetooth gear, the delays are just far too great for it to be of use. Wireless transeviers do exist in the pro world but are built for purpose with a strong focus on reduced latendy and a cost usually to match.

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